A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover

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The windows at the front of the house have classic split glazing, but the rear windows span two stories, providing unobstructed views.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
A pivoting front door is surrounded by glass that can be darkened or lightened with a switch. “The entrance is somewhat low-key to allow for a bigger ‘wow’ moment with the stairs,” says architect Robert Tretsch.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
The steel and wooden stairs are supported by a block of marble. Above, a digital fresco on recombination has been
mounted on the ceiling, and the hanging pendant in rose gold is the Regency Chain Link Light by Carrie Livingston.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

Harrison Design architect Robert Tretsch modified the facade by removing archways and oval windows, painting the exterior off-white, and designing a pivoting glass front door. Inside, wood, glass, stone slabs, and metal complement an open floor plan throughout. The redesign actually started with a redesign of the kitchen, so its industrial materials became an inspiration for the rest of the house. “Every piece of the kitchen is bespoke and meticulously detailed,” says Tretsch. “There’s even a closet hidden behind a steel-covered door.”

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
Calico’s “Topographies” wallcovering gives the impression of an archaeological journey in the master bedroom, enhanced by floor-to-ceiling windows. The custom oak/walnut architectural backdrop is from Block & Chisel. The pendants are from Fendi and the bed is from Flou.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
White onyx counters and a heated walnut floor distinguish the main bathroom.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
Some rooms have intentionally low-key lighting, like recessed LED lighting, but not the dining room, where a custom chandelier by Danish artisan Vibeke Fonnesberg Schmidt artistically reflects the light. “When we used decorative lighting, we selected bold and surprising pieces that act like sculptures,” says Ferguson.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

The master bedroom also has its jaw-dropping moments. A wall of floor-to-ceiling windows, architectural wallpaper, and a bespoke steel fireplace give it the kind of drama usually reserved for more public spaces. A custom oak slat architectural backdrop adds warmth as it rises and extends to the ceiling.

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
The steel and wood kitchen is bright nonetheless, thanks to an abundance of natural light and the mix of metals for sparkle. Custom oak and bird’s eye maple cabinetry from Block & Chisel is joined by quartzite blue, Fusion Blue from Walker Zanger, and appliances from Wolf, Miele and Sub-Zero.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
The Muhammad Ali wallpaper from the Andy Warhol collection by Flavor Paper provides an inspiring and unexpected backdrop for the gym.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
The breakfast area showcases the floating wall seen from across the living room. The leather chairs are from Maxalto.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
The elegant quartzite floor in the living room is carefully matched; the stone came from several sources across the country. A Minotti sofa and a Ligne Roset chaise longue add a clean look. Flou’s floor lamp also reflects the owners’ love for Italian furniture.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

A 1932 English-style house in Brookhaven gets a makeover
The modern poolhouse takes up the construction materials of the main house, including the marble slabs. The spectacular waterfall from the roofline flows into an infinity pool.

Photography by Emily Followill / Styling by Yvonne Orchard

“They wanted a house that transitioned easily from indoors to outdoors,” says Ferguson. Outside, a stunning steel and wood pool house features a cantilevered roof with a waterfall cascading from its edge. Landscape architect Bill Caldwell incorporated specimen topiary trees, an Alaskan cedar, and a variety of grasses to complement the striking architecture, adding a touch of whimsy in places to keep the look unexpected.

The house channels European design — which has always blended modern and historic elements — but local craftsmen and the backdrop of maple trees maintain a lovely Atlanta vibe.

Resources | Interior design : Karen Ferguson, ASID Architect: Robert Tretsch, AIA | Both: Harrison Design, harrisondesign.com Landscape architect: Bill Caldwell, bcladesign.com Mural of the stairwell: Recombination through Maharam’s showroom in Atlanta, maharam.com. The living room Sofa: Minotti, minottibyddc.com. Meridian: Ligne Roset, line-roset.com. Floor lamp: Blur, blur.it/en. Carpet: Tai Ping carpet, taipingcarpets.com. Kitchen Cabinetmaking: block and chisel, blockandchisel.com. Quartzite: Walker Zanger, walkerzanger.com. Refrigerator: Sub-Zero, Wolf and Cove, subzero-wolf.com. Steam, grill, electric oven: Sub-Zero, Wolf and Cove. Combi-steam oven, microwave, warming drawer: Miele, honeyusa.com. Dining room Table: KGBL, kgblnyc.com. Chandelier: Danish artisan Vibeke Fonnesberg Schmidt, customized by Harrison Design. master bedroom Wallcovering: “Topographies”, Calico, calicowallpaper.com. Architectural oak/walnut background: Block & Chisel. Pendants: Fendi, fendi.com. Reads: Blur. Primary bath Custom cabinets and mirrors: Block & Chisel. Lighting: Terzani, terzani.com. Gym Wallpaper: scented paper, flavorpaper.com.

This article originally appeared in the Spring 2022 issue of HOUSE of Atlanta Magazine.

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