Architects envision CIRCULAR building 1,800ft tall two miles wide that would wrap around Burj Khalifa

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Incredible images have been dreamed up to illustrate one of the most daring, imaginative and unlikely architectural designs of recent times in the form of a giant 1.8 mile ring that would wrap around the Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

Dubai-based experimental architecture firm ZNera Space came up with the concept, known as Downtown Circle, as a ring supported by five huge pillars 1,804 feet above the ground.

The wacky design would bring Dubai-like luxury style with residential community spaces and environmental sustainability technology into a self-contained mini-city of homes, offices and leisure spaces.

ZNera Space’s lead architects, Najmus Chowdry and Nils Remess, see the design as an antidote to Dubai’s dizzying skyline, but admit the funding and even the technology to build it aren’t there.

“It was meant to be a conversation starter,” Chowdry said. “Something that could inspire people to rethink urban development, rethink urban congestion… We promise the sustainable city.”

Dubai-based experimental architecture firm ZNera Space has drawn up plans for a giant circular structure around the Burj Khalifa known as the Downtown Circle, a 1.8-mile ring supported by five huge pillars at 1,804ft above ground.

ZNera Space's lead architects Najmus Chowdry and Nils Remess see the design as an antidote to Dubai's dizzying skyline, but admit the funding and even the technology to build it aren't there

ZNera Space’s lead architects Najmus Chowdry and Nils Remess see the design as an antidote to Dubai’s dizzying skyline, but admit the funding and even the technology to build it aren’t there

The wacky design would bring Dubai-like luxury style with residential community spaces and environmental sustainability technology into a self-contained mini-city of homes, offices and leisure spaces

The wacky design would bring Dubai-like luxury style with residential community spaces and environmental sustainability technology into a self-contained mini-city of homes, offices and leisure spaces

The structure would have five stories connected by a continuous green belt, dubbed the Skypark so residents could enjoy and have access to nature 1,800 feet above the ground.

The structure would have five stories connected by a continuous green belt, dubbed the Skypark so residents could enjoy and have access to nature 1,800 feet above the ground.

“We were working on very important aspects that raise discussion about how we plan cities,” Remess added. “The reason we chose the Burj Khalifa was because it’s in a very dense urban area, and we want to address the issues that come with dense urban populations.”

The pillars would be planted in empty land scattered around the Burj Khalifa – the world’s tallest building – and could incorporate a smog-filtering design that ZNera Space proposed and which was shortlisted for the World Festival of Architecture prize. 2018 in the category ‘Experimental Future Project.’

“We wanted to create a microclimate downtown and create a sort of envelope around the area to control the temperature and make it more livable in hot weather,” Chowdry said. ‘You can use these verticals [pillars] as urban air purifiers.’

Durability in a warming region that already experiences temperatures regularly above 40 degrees is a priority for Chowdry and Remess.

The nearly two miles of rooftop real estate will be lined with solar panels and they want to use hydrogen solar cells to convert water into hydrogen which can power air conditioning and provide power to the building.

There would also be an internal streetcar system to transport residents that could reach speeds of 62 miles per hour. Ports and landing pads would also be built to accommodate air taxis.

The pillars would be planted in empty land scattered around the Burj Khalifa - the world's tallest building - and could incorporate a smog-filtering design that ZNera Space proposed and which was shortlisted for the World Festival of Architecture prize. 2018 in the category 'Experimental Future Project'

The pillars would be planted in empty land scattered around the Burj Khalifa – the world’s tallest building – and could incorporate a smog-filtering design that ZNera Space proposed and which was shortlisted for the World Festival of Architecture prize. 2018 in the category ‘Experimental Future Project’

“The Skypark is the central backbone of the whole design,” explained chief architect Najmus Chowdry. “It will be a mixed-use green space and it will also serve as a space to rethink the way agriculture is going to happen in the future, especially in cities”

There would be an internal tram system to transport residents that could reach speeds of 62 miles per hour and ports and landing pads would also be built to accommodate air taxis.

There would be an internal tram system to transport residents that could reach speeds of 62 miles per hour and ports and landing pads would also be built to accommodate air taxis.

“We were working on very important aspects that raise discussion about how we plan cities,” said Nils Remess, co-lead architect.

“We were working on very important aspects that raise discussion about how we plan cities,” said Nils Remess, co-lead architect. “The reason we chose the Burj Khalifa is that it is in a very dense urban area and we want to address the issues that come with dense urban populations”

One of the first challenges to overcome, if the funding and political will were still in place, would be to come up with a structure strong enough to house the interior elements, but light enough to be supported by the pillars.

One of the first challenges to overcome, if the funding and political will were still in place, would be to come up with a structure strong enough to house the interior elements, but light enough to be supported by the pillars.

The structure would have five stories connected by a continuous green belt, dubbed the Skypark.

“The Skypark is the central backbone of the entire design,” Chowdry explained. “It will be a mixed-use green space and it will also serve as a space to rethink the way agriculture is going to happen in the future, especially in cities.”

“If you look historically, agriculture came first, then we built the city,” Remess said.

“Now we kind of lost that concept. With this green belt inside the structure, we want to bring agriculture and food production back to the city center.

One of the first challenges to overcome, if the funding and political will were still in place, would be to come up with a structure strong enough to house the interior features, but light enough to be supported by the pillars.

“The structure itself is quite light. I imagine it as a (big) airplane – the skin, the ribs, which become the structure and inside everything is hollow,” Chowdry said.

“But then it’s supported by these columns and the circular ring,” he continued. “We chose to make it circular because it is the most stable structural format.”

The plan was dreamed up with Dubai’s hopeful master plan to create a sustainable urban environment by 2040.

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