Raus is a forward thinking cabin rental in Germany

0

Time spent in nature is proven to be good medicine for the soul. Our modern lives are often extremely hectic, and finding balance by seeking quiet time outdoors can be a simple way to promote wellness in one’s life.

For many people, a popular way to get out of town is to simply rent a cabin for the weekend, which can be easier than the logistics of planning an entire camping trip. Many companies are now springing up to meet this demand, such as German hotel tech start-up Raus, which recently teamed up with Danish-born Berlin architect Sigurd Larsen to create a modern cabin that guests across the city can rent.

The Raus cabin features a surprisingly modern profile in black, in addition to its rather boxy shape that recalls the dimensional envelope of most small homes. Surrounded by nature and located on the edge of the Wehrmuehle cultural garden in Brandenburg, Germany. Larsen’s design is the first of the new model in the range of small cabins inspired by Raus’ houses, which temporarily occupy other idyllic locations in Germany.

Raus


As Larsen explains, designing for such a compact footprint can be a challenge:

“Working with just a few cubic meters is in some ways always a challenge for architects. But at the same time I found it inspiring because there is such a clear framework for what is possible. J hope that every guest can make this place their own and feel at home, even for a limited time.”

Raus


The first thing you notice upon entering is how dark everything is — every surface, from the kitchen counters and appliances to the walls — is painted black. There is an explanation for this “radical” design decision, as Larsen wanted unobstructed views of nature, through the large glass windows that surround the unit:

“It was really about avoiding reflections in the glass, because it would be a shame if everything you saw in the window was somehow your own reflection.”


Designed as a series of small rooms within one large room, the 193-square-foot (18-square-meter) cabin interior accommodates up to four people and is suitable for small pet-free families looking to spend some quality time together . It is solar powered but is connected to on-grid backup power at this current location.

Raus


The design concept divides the cabin longitudinally in the middle, with the front part more open to the outside thanks to its large windows. The rear area is where the beds and bathroom are seemingly cut into the overall volume, the designer explains:

“The bed, the sofa, the bunk beds and the bathroom are all niches in an inhabited wall. In this way, we have created a cave-like situation where you can crawl and feel protected on one side, and have an unobstructed view in all other directions. The idea behind the mobile cabins is to frame the idyllic view, literally, using the large picture windows.”

The cabin’s heat source comes from the compact wood-burning stove that sits by the main sliding glass door.

Raus


The kitchen is installed in a corner of the cabin and has been strategically placed so that one can have an almost panoramic view of the outside while cooking.

Raus


The niche for the smaller bunk bed is quite comfortable and has a small wall shelf. When not in use as a bed, it also functions as a daybed for lounging and reading. It can be hard to tell apart, but there’s a built-in ladder at the end of the bed that provides access to the bunk bed above. .

Raus


As can be seen in this night shot, above the lower bunk bed we have another bunk bed above, lit by its own skylight and reading lamp.

Raus


The larger bed is spacious and with the large sliding glass door open can provide a peaceful and lazy morning experience of reading in bed.

Raus


The shower is small but has a skylight above to let in more light and to allow a view of the tree canopy above while washing up.

Raus


Reservations are unfortunately no longer accepted at this location due to its popularity, but there are plans to move this version of the Raus cabin to another temporary location in the future.

To learn more, visit Raus.

Share.

Comments are closed.